Six on Saturday: Of roses and builders

As I write, the sun is pouring through the sitting room window. I have just been out in the garden planting bare root roses and noticed new nasturtium and potato plants which have come up, not too mention my namesake calendula still flowering their little socks off. If it were not for the leaves falling from the trees, it would not feel like November.

Each week The Propagator invites his followers to blog six things going on in their garden. It can be anything at all and this week mine are a bit of a hotch potch.

  1. Bareroot roses

The aforementioned roses arrived from David Austin this week and I have just got all three of them in the ground. I am a terrible procrastinator and if I don’t do a job straight away it may never get done. Rosa Emily Bronte and Rosa Felicité Perpetue both went straight into their allotted slots, which I had already dug over and added horse manure compost. But when I started digging in the place where I planned to put the flamboyant Rosa Lady Emma Hamilton, I realised the ground was just too shallow and chalky in this spot. I tried a couple of positions and it turn out she wants to go between the hellebores in the front garden in a place that is partially shady, but gets some warm southern sun. Hopefully she will be happy there.

2. Builders

IMG_1850

On Monday morning our builders are arriving bright and early to start work on our bathroom, which means we will have no washing facilities for the next month other than a small basin and rather cold toilet downstairs. This week, our neighbour’s builder started work on constructing a side entrance to her house and in the process took down a large box ball which sat behind our gatepost. This has been a bit of a shock as this area now looks rather bare and it has opened up a new street view, as well as lost us some privacy. But to be fair, the box was pushing down our wall, which he is now going to rebuild which is a bonus. When he has finished work I will have to think about what to do with this area by our front gate. (The funny piece of metal is an old sewer vent which will also have to come out.)

3. Sarah Raven labels

‘Those are nice plant labels, where did you get them?’ my mum asked me this week. I had to remind her she bought them for me from Sarah Raven several years ago since when they have been sitting in the shed waiting to be used. I am rather pleased with them marking up the new bulbs I have planted. I think it looks a little bit like something they might do in a stately home garden (pretentious, moi?)

4. Calendula

IMG_1852

It’s in the name of my blog and it has been flowering now pretty much consistently since June. What a doer.

5. New growth

IMG_1851

I must have left some potatoes in this bed and they have grown again! Also in the bed behind is a new nasturtium plant. From memory I put some seeds of a rather special variety of nasturtium in here, so I will try not to disturb it when I dig this bed over.

6. Teasel

IMG_1849I love the wintry silhouette of this self-seeded teasel, growing just behind the wall which divides our garden from our next door neighbours’ steps.

Don’t forget to check out The Propagator’s blog and the comments from his ever-growing merry crew.

 

17 Comments

  1. A month w/o washing facilities? O my goodness, how 19th century. I spit a few nails over 2 mo w/o a kitchen sink, but take over my bathroom? I’d need to be medicated. At least you have calendula & nasturium to comfort you. Those roses sounds wonderful. Looking forward to next year’s photos.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. I always intend to put plant labels next to things but never do. I always think I’ll remember what things are. I rarely do. Maybe fancy plant labels would inspire me to use them. Love the view of the teasel. I thought it was the sea behind them for a moment. Hope the building work goes okay.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Your plant labels are so much nicer than my white plastic ones which I had to resort to as I can’t remember all the names of my plants, and the original labels always seem to go walkabout. A whole month without a bathroom! I hope your builders work hard every day and that it gets finished in the allotted time.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Goodness! Bare root season already! It will start here as well in about a month. Most comes in as the Christmas trees go out. I will not be getting anything this year, unless we get some cane berries and currants. There will be no fruit trees. I would like to get two hybrid tea roses, but I do not think that will happen either this year.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. My roses arrived this week too. I needed 5 of one variety and decided to go for the 10 rose hedging bundle as it was good value. Still 5 to find a home for! I think I’ve sussed a spot but they’re soaking in a bucket waiting for me to finish reading all the lovely Six on Saturday posts!

    Liked by 1 person

  6. I like your plant labels, very smart. I still have some Calendula flowering, but just in the front garden. The ones in the back got frosted. I have planted my new roses too. Two in their final positions and one, due to indeciciveness, in a pot for now. I think I might need to make a new planter for it. Nothing’s ever easy.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. I’m patiently awaiting the arrival of my bareroot roses. Actually anxiously, as one was despatched on Thursday and has still not arrived! The teasels are great, And like you I have sprouting potatoes and a fantastic crop of calendula. I should pull up the calendula but their brightness is so cheery.

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Comment

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.